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Car crash victims in Kentucky, as anywhere else, need to take several steps to ensure that they can be reimbursed for their losses. It all starts with the time immediately after the crash. First off, victims should assess the damage, call an ambulance if anyone is injured and call the police. The police can write a report that victims can then file with their insurance company.

Exchanging contact and insurance information

The parties involved in a crash should share their names and insurance information. Phone numbers are desirable, too. Apart from that, though, the parties should not interact too much with one another. They should avoid admitting guilt, too.

Victims should jot down what happened in their own words. They should also get the contact information for anyone who witnessed the event. Vehicle damage and injuries could be photographed. It’s also good to take down the police officer’s name and number.

What insurance policies can cover

Property damage and bodily injury liability coverage, provided that the other driver has these, can cover vehicle repair costs and medical expenses. Other times, one’s own uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage could come in handy. In no-fault states, victims will naturally be filing with their own insurance company unless their injuries reach a “serious injury” threshold. Kentucky is a choice no-fault state.

Seeking out legal representation

Many victims of motor vehicle accidents file a third-party insurance claim because their own insurance cannot cover the losses. Perhaps this describes your case. You may want a lawyer to help you file your claim, then, because insurance companies can be aggressive in denying payment. They may even try to force you into settling for less than you deserve. A lawyer may sidestep these tactics and negotiate on your behalf using evidence gained through third parties like accident investigators.