COVID-19 UPDATE: To protect your safety and the safety of our staff, we are offering our clients the ability to connect via telephone, video conference, or in person as usual. To discuss your options, please call the office.

Understanding the first year of an SCI

On Behalf of | Apr 30, 2022 | Personal Injury

Spinal cord injuries, whether people fully recover from them or not, require weeks and months to handle. When someone sustains an SCI, finding compensation for the cost of recovery tends to be an afterthought compared to the urgent nature of recovery.

According to Medical News Today, a person’s mortality risk in the first year is two to five times higher than average. Knowing what to expect in the days, weeks and months afterward may help guide how to manage recovery—both physically and financially.

Days after

After the hospital stabilizes a patient and performs any emergency surgery, his or her first few days may feel static. In order to reduce swelling and further damage, doctors may employ a neck brace or other means to keep movement to a minimum as they observe the initial recovery.

Weeks after

Rehabilitation begins as soon as it is safe. Patients may spend much of their time in a facility designed for regular rest and therapy before an eventual discharge.

Months after

By this point, patients have a general idea of what their future looks like and may have a long-term care plan to help over the coming months. Further recovery, physical therapy and rehabilitation happen as people adjust to whatever new normal they have ahead of them.

First-year costs

According to the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center, the average first-year cost of SCIs ranges between $375,000 and over $1.14 million, depending on the severity. There are options to recover some or all of this financial burden for those facing such costs due to a negligent accident or otherwise.