This is an advertisement.

FLORENCE KENTUCKY LEGAL BLOG

Photo of the attorneys at Monohan and Monohan

COVID-19 UPDATE: To protect your safety and the safety of our staff, we are offering our clients the ability to connect via telephone, video conference, or in person as usual. To discuss your options, please call the office.

Developmental delays can be a sign of pediatric brain injury

When your child is between the ages of 1 and 6, his or her brain functions much like a sponge. That is, it readily absorbs information. This causes your child’s brain to progress rapidly through a few distinct developmental stages. Unfortunately, a brain injury can disrupt normal brain development or even stop it altogether.

Pediatric TBIs are exceedingly common in the U.S. In fact, according to the Brain Injury Association of America, brain injuries are the primary cause of both death and permanent disability for kids under the age of 14.

How do pediatric brain injuries happen?

As you may suspect, there is a number of ways a child can seriously injure his or her brain. Excluding falls, cars pose the biggest risk to kids. Specifically, your child may suffer a pediatric brain injury in a motor vehicle crash or in a struck-by collision.

Why are pediatric brain injuries difficult to diagnose?

Young children often are unable to put their pain and other injury-related symptoms into words. This can make pediatric TBIs exceedingly difficult to diagnose. Unfortunately, your pediatrician may believe something else is to blame for your child’s symptoms.

How can you help?

You probably know your son or daughter better than anyone else does. You are also in a prime position to identify injury-associated developmental delays. Put simply, if your child misses certain developmental milestones or is slow to reach them, he or she may need immediate medical attention.

Ultimately, because a pediatric TBI can plague your child for the rest of his or her life, it may be necessary to pursue financial compensation from the driver who caused or contributed to it.